Atlas, Submitted.

The past few weeks have been cold. Bloody cold. OK, not Canada cold, so I can’t complain so much, but there’s something to be said about doing voice work when you’re chilly.

I have to rug up in layers, of course, because the garage isn’t heated and, though the sound booth has a good bit of insulation, it, too, is not heated. In summer it’s a hot-house and in winter it’s a refrigerator. The problem with layers, though, is that the warmer stuff tends to be noisy.

Noisy clothes? Yep, totally. You probably don’t pay much attention to it, but when you move your arm or twist your torso, or lean forward or back, or even roll you neck, there’s an associated noise. If you’re naked, it’s not so evident. If you’ve got on cotton, it’s hushed. If you’re wearing a polyester puffer-jacket, it’s the equivalent of unwrapping a Mars bar in the middle of a quiet cinema.

Not good. The slightest shuffle or motion (let alone wild gesticulations) are captured on the mike and each scene needs to be done again. And again. It’s a waste of time, but at least I’m warm.

Cotton hoodies are pretty good, so long as I suppress the zipper on the front. It makes little ‘tink, tink’ noises that are pretty darn obvious. I’ve taken to putting a blob of blu-tack underneath to stop it chattering while I’m vocalising. The chair is solid, steel chair, very cold on the tuchus, so I’ve put a small cushion on and covered it with a terry towel.

I can’t put a heater in there because the space is too confined for anything that isn’t electric, and electric heaters are notorious for making a hum. I’m thinking seriously about pre-heating the space before I start, to take the edge off. Makes sense, I guess, only we’re on the other side of winter and that means the days are getting warmer and all of this effort will be for nothing until the next year.

So that was me these past few weeks: Squatting in a rickety sound booth, freezing my proverbials off, rugging up in a woolen beanie, gloves and scarf with a wodge of blu-tack stuck to my zipper. And that’s if the weather was favourable. It was a slog, but I got through it and I’m happy.

I had to do the supermarket scene again because there was a lot of choppiness and I flubbed the voices. Everyone got a bit too bogan and by the end of it, I couldn’t even understand what I was saying.

After all of that, Atlas, Broken has been turned into an audiobook and submitted through Findaway for processing. It will be a few weeks before we see it come out the other side. Fingers crossed I’ve dotted all my i’s.

Of Crickets and Ants

In Atlas, Broken, Henry comes across a cricket in his backyard, chirruping merrily at the moon.

The next day, he finds it savagely gutted by ants.

I’m not an expert when it comes to the life-cycle of crickets. Where I live, they come out every Spring, all shiny and black, and chirp like mad throughout Summer.

During Summer you can look in the cracks in the clay soil and find them poking their glossy, black heads out, twitching their antennae, leaping and scurrying away with a purpose. Chirp! Chirp! Their song is full of energy and promise. It’s a chorus of hope, a medley without a beginning and without an end, just one, constant beat. Chirp! Chirp!

And then, as autumn sets in, you hear their tune change. They sing their sorrowful song, their lives are nearly spent. Crrr… Crrr… The grass hides little black bodies, shuffling around aimlessly, hiding when one approaches, silencing their song temporarily until they feel safe once again. Crrr. Crrr.

The cold creeps in. More and more one finds the shells of crickets crumpled on the ground. A mess of brown and black limbs, they have been trodden on, or they simply gave up scurrying. The ants are ruthless, cutting them to bits, dragging all of the smaller pieces back to their nests, leaving the chunky husk to be blown about or crushed underfoot.

After a couple of days there’s nothing left as a reminder. No marking stone, no stain, nothing. The rain has washed away anything the wind has left behind. It might as well be that the cricket never existed at all.

Cricket

If we look at Henry in the light of the Cricket, is there any wonder that he has such empathy for his little companion?Mini Jeztyr Logo